Tags: running

Treatment of ankle sprain with acupuncture : Health, News – India Today

ankle sprain

Ankle sprains!   They seem so innocuous sometimes, but can cause long-lasting problems if not treated appropriately.  Even if the swelling and pain isn’t bad, altered motor control and compensatory patterns can occur that don’t return to normal even long after the bruising has disappeared and you’ve regained full range of motion.  Really, it’s not something you want to leave untreated only to have it cause more problems later.  Lucky for you – you know me – and we can do so much more than ice  (side note, please please please stop icing everything) and not only decrease pain and swelling, but help get back your range of motion, stability and motor control.  And as it happens ankle sprains are one of my very favorite things to treat! This is because acupuncture works SO WELL – for both acute and chronic ankle sprains.

From the linked study:

“Of the 126 cases, 98 cases (77.78%) were completely cured, 17cases (13.49%) showed a marked effect, 8cases ( 6.35%) showed a moderate effect, and there was no effect in 3cases 2.38%. The total effective rate was 97.62%. Of the 98 cases that recovered completely, the least number of treatments is 1 and the most is 7, the average is 4 treatments.”

via Health alert: Treatment of ankle sprain with acupuncture : Health, News – India Today.

All this is to say, acupuncture is pretty effective in the treatment of ankle sprains.  Remember this next time you or someone you know rolls an ankle – come in and let me help!

So what exactly is Functional Movement?

So you’ve heard me mention functional movement a few times, I went to a whole conference on it in Raleigh, it’s a bit of a buzzword in the fitness world these days but you may not be exactly sure what it really means, or what it means for you.

What IS functional movement? 

A basic definition of functional movement is: movement that is based on real-world biomechanics.  These movements are usually multi-planar, multi-joint and require adequate motor control. In other words functional movements are usually whole body movements that can be applied in many different real-world situations – think about a squat, or pulling and pushing progressions – these are movements we use variations of many many times a day – going from sitting to standing, pushing a box on an overhead shelf, pulling the cord to start your lawn mower…

If that’s still not particularly clear – contrast functional movement to something like sport-specific movement or muscle-specific movement.   For instance – sport-specific movements might be hitting a baseball, a tennis serve, kicking a soccer ball – while there is often some cross-over between sports-specific and functional movements, sport-specific movements tend to be of higher complexity and less broadly applicable to everyday life.  Muscle-specific movements aim to isolate a specific muscle so that it alone (or mostly) is doing the work – think bicep curl, or leg extension machine.  These exercises are generally less practical in day to day life, there are very rarely times when you will be required to use an isolated muscle to complete a task outside of a gym.

Why does this matter?

Think about it, have you ever injured yourself and realized exactly how difficult it was to do basic every-day things like put on shoes, or sit on the toilet, or get a shirt on or off?  I know I have, and pretty much every one of my patients has experienced this at some point.  That is dysfunctional movement and pain.  However, it is entirely possible (and very common) to have dysfunctional movement without pain and you may not even be aware of it.  What do you think happens over time if you have a non-painful dysfunctional movement pattern?  If your answer is get injured, dingdingding! you win! If we don’t correct dysfunctional movement patterns, over time they will become more dysfunctional and likely set us up for future injury. This is where movement screening and assessment comes in.

What is a movement assessment/screen and why would I need one? 

A movement screen is used if you don’t currently experience any pain and it is used to predict injury risk.  By rating your movements in a screen, your score will tell you how functional/dysfunctional your movements are.  A movement assessment is used when pain exists.  Since pain absolutely alters the way we move, we have to look at it a bit differently and try to determine what is causing the inability/dysfunction.

In the words of Gray Cook:
“Movement screening and movement assessment are important because these two systems bridge the gap between real life activities, and medical or performance testing and advanced biomechanical analysis.”

In the sports medicine world it is a well-know fact that the biggest predictor of injury is previous injury.  So, how do we get better at preventing injury? – we can’t just look at tissues and joints and ranges of motion, we have to look at the big picture, not just all the pieces, but also how our brains are talking to them.  And one way to do this is to look at both the quality and quantity of movement in a standardized way, such as through a functional movement screen (FMS) or a selective functional movement assessment (SFMA).  As most of my patients are already in pain when I see them, I decided to start incorporating the SFMA into my practice. This is a big piece of what I learned at the Functional Movement Summit out in Raleigh and I think it fits beautifully into Anatomy Acupuncture’s practice paradigm.  So, be on the look out – I’ll probably be assessing your movement in the near future.

One more thought: 

We don’t move in isolation.  I often say to my patients when they come in with pain somewhere – that for better or worse everything is connected.  Sometimes it’s wonderful we work that way, and sometimes it’s a pain in the you know what – it’d much easier if it was isolated.  However, since in fact everything IS connected, and sometimes (often) where you hurt isn’t where the problem is, the same is true with movement – the things we have to do daily, that allow us to be functional, are not isolated movements – they involve multiple muscles, coordination, joint mobility and stability and motor control.  Movements, even simple ones, are whole body affairs.  How well are you moving?

More on this topic soon!

heal faster. move better.

 

Running Hood to Coast? We can help!

Are you getting ready for hood to coast next weekend? If so, we are running a promotion just for you.  Because we’d like to see you run the best race you can and recover beautifully we’re offering 20% off our acupuncture services if you book a pre and post race appointment!

see the details on our facebook page below!

Do you experience Barbie-foot-itis*?

If you’ve ever experienced numbness, coldness and some loss of function1 in your foot  – you know, barbie-foot-itis* – you’ll want to check out UltraU’s interview with me below:

Last month I chronicled my frustrations with numbness in my foot after a race. I called my numb, tingling and cold foot that felt like plastic my Barbie foot. I was trying to make light of the fact that I could barely control my foot, running felt like I was wearing strange plastic heels and I couldn’t feel a thing.  I went to Alexis at Anatomy Acupuncture to see if she could help. Now that my Barbie foot-itis is GONE, I wanted to share a bit about it from her perspective and introduce you to the idea of Sports Acupuncture as another tool in your body work toolkit… 
Dana Katz, Ultrarunner, Founder/Coach at UltraUFitness

To see what she asked me, how I answered, and what acupuncture can do for endurance athletes read on at the UltraU Blog : 3 Questions with Sports Acupuncturist Alexis Goldstein, L.Ac., C.SMA – UltraU.

*Barbie-foot-itis is not a technical term, but it probably should be.  All neologistic rights belong to Dana Katz.  Also her Hazard Scale is right on.  Check it out.  Follow her blog.  And if you like running really far, she can help you with that, too. 

1In all seriousness – if you’re experiencing the above mentioned symptoms on an on-going basis, it may be cause for concern.  Please contact a medical professional for advice if these symptoms are more than transient. 

Disclaimer:This website does not provide medical advice.
This blog provides general information and discussion about medicine, health and related subjects.  The words and other content provided in this blog, and in any linked materials, are not intended and should not be construed as medical advice. If the reader or any other person has a medical concern, he or she should consult with an appropriately-licensed physician or other health care worker. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this blog or in any linked materials. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately.The views expressed on this blog and website have no relation to those of any academic or other institution with which the author is affiliated.