At anatomy acupuncture we know your health is paramount.

Your health is also individual to you.

Therefore we offer a variety of services to provide you with a holistic & wholly personal treatment plan.

Services

Acupuncture

Gaining popularity with professional sports teams, acupuncture is used to help athletes recover from their injuries quickly, prevent future injuries and enhance their overall performance. Acupuncture creates a balanced physical and mental condition which enables optimal athletic performance. Individuals participating in athletics at any level, be it recreational or professional, can benefit from acupuncture as part of their routine. By decreasing recovery time, diminishing muscle soreness and preventing injury acupuncture is useful both for treating injury as well as part of a general conditioning program to enhance overall performance. Acupuncture is used in conjunction with a variety of techniques such as:  tui na (Chinese medical massage), selective functional movement assessment (sfma), kinesio-taping, PNF stretching and corrective exercise to reset and reinforce functional movement patterns. This allows areas that are over-used and/or injured the chance to return to balance and heal, as well as re-establish the proper dynamic between opposing muscle groups. This results in reduced pain, better agility and freedom of movement in the athlete. Acupuncture can be used to treat injuries; in the local area it increases blood circulation which reduces necessary healing time as well as minimizes bruising and swelling. Improved healing and reduction of pain means less time out of practice and makes acupuncture an excellent way to treat strains, sprains and other athletic injuries.  Additionally, acupuncture treats the whole body, not just the injured area, and can be used to enhance performance. By attaining a physical, mental and emotional balance, receiving acupuncture can optimize performance. This is done by promoting relaxation, enabling mental clarity and the ability to focus, decreasing stress and reducing physical discomfort. As acupuncture is advantageous for both the physical and mental aspects involved in the practice of sport; many athletes use acupuncture to relieve the anxiety and stress often inherent in performance, as well as to help them become centered and focused on their tasks. Benefits of acupuncture include: reduced recovery time decreased pain, inflammation, and swelling reduced occurrence of muscle spasms improved circulation decreased stress increased energy, stamina and flexibility improved concentration As research increasingly demonstrates, acupuncture is beneficial on it’s own as well as part of an integrated treatment plan.

Alexis is honored to continue to work with professional and Olympic athletes.  She is comfortable working as part of a training/medical team to help provide coordinated care for elite athletes.  She is available to work with your team on an on-going basis or for short time periods such as training camps.

One of the major styles of acupuncture, Japanese acupuncture is based on much of the same theory as Traditional Chinese Medicine. However, unlike acupuncture in China, acupuncture theory and practice developed separately from herbal medicine in Japan. Primarily practiced by the blind for centuries, Japanese style acupuncture heavily relies on palpation of the abdomen and meridians as well as the pulses.

Japanese style acupuncture generally involves the use of very thin needles, and extremely mild stimulation. Additionally, direct moxa is the most predominant adjunct to a to a Japanese style treatment. This style of acupuncture is ideal for needle sensitive patients and those who require a more subtle treatment

Electro-acupuncture (EA), or electrical stimulation (e-stim) is the application of a small electrical current to the acupuncture needles. E-stim is a way to provide reliable, consistent stimulation to acupuncture points without prolonged manipulation of the needles by hand.

E-stim generally enhances the effect of acupuncture therapy by raising the level of analgesia and extending the treatment’s effectiveness. The additional stimulation of the acupuncture needles helps to promote tissue repair, as well as healing and regenerating nerve fibers essential to the treatment of many chronic conditions. Because of its pain-relieving abilities, electro-acupuncture is often used in cases of acute and chronic musculoskeletal pain. EA can be used to treat a variety of disorders including pain, muscle spasms, numbness, nerve dysfunction, paralysis and atrophy.

For more information on electro-acupuncture, please read this article by the Institute for Traditional Medicine.

Acupuncture is part of a complete system of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) that originated in China 2,000 to 5,000 years ago. Outside of China, TCM has been practiced for about 200 years. So, while new to us, acupuncture has a long recorded history of efficiency and is used by nearly one third of the world’s population as a primary health care system and by countless others as an adjunctive treatment.

The fundamental principles of acupuncture are to treat the person as an integrated whole in body, mind, and spirit – everything is connected! One of the strengths of TCM is its focus on pattern based medicine that treats the root cause of illness and disease, not just the symptoms.

The needles used to stimulate acupuncture points are very slender; barely beyond the thickness of a human hair. Dozens can fit inside a single hypodermic needle!  Acupuncture needles are filiform, meaning they do not have a hollow center, but instead are solid. The finest quality stainless steel, pre-sterilized, single-use, disposable needles are used. The sensation from the needle varies from person to person. You may feel nothing at all, a quick pinch or perhaps a heavy dull ache or tingle.

 

According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the World Health Organization (WHO)
acupuncture is an effective treatment for the following conditions:

  • Addictions
  • Infections, cold, flu
  • Arthritis
  • Insomnia
  • Back Pain
  • Menstrual & Female Disorders
  • Carpal Tunnel
  • Muscle/Joint Pain (tendonitis, bursitis, sprains)
  • Chemotherapy Nausea
  • Post-operative Pain/Dental Pain
  • Depression
  • Sinusitis
  • Digestive Problems (ulcers, nausea, gastritis, IBS)
  • Skin Disorders
  • Ear Problems( ringing, earaches)
  • Stroke Rehabilitation
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Urinary Problems

Click on the links above for more information on sports medicine acupuncture, Japanese style acupuncture and electro-acupuncture.

 

Tui na

Often used in conjunction with acupuncture, tui na is a form of Chinese manipulative therapy that follows the principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine. The style is quite different than what you may have received from a typical massage therapist.


Tui na, literally translated as “push grasp,” includes various oscillating and pressure techniques to move qi and blood in the meridian and muscle systems.

Tui na encompasses a variety of methods from light pressure to deep-tissue work which can be used to treat both acute and chronic conditions.

Commonly used to treat musculo-skeletal problems, tui na is also effective at treating pain, stress, digestive, respiratory and circulatory conditions.

Moxibustion

Direct moxibustion involves the placement of a small cone of pure moxa on top of an acupuncture point, directly on the skin and burned.  The moxa cone is extinguished before it burns the skin. This type of moxibustion is common in Japanese style acupuncture.

 

Indirect moxibustion involves the burning of moxa, but without direct placement on the skin.

Commonly ‘stick moxa’ is used – here moxa is rolled in to a cigar-shaped stick and one end is lit. The lit stick moxa is help over the area being treated and the patient should feel a pleasant warming sensation. Stick moxa can use regular moxa or a compressed smokeless variant.

Another type of indirect moxibustion, known as needle-head moxa (as shown here), involves placing moxa on the end of an inserted needle, thereby conducting heat into the point.

Moxibustion is a form of heat therapy and a technique used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) that involves the burning of mugwort (a plant related to sage that is often just referred to simply as “moxa”) to promote healing. Moxa’s function in TCM is to expel cold and warm the meridians. It has a wonderfully pleasant heat that the body holds onto well. Warming the meridians allows for a smooth flow of blood and qi – which means it can be useful for numerous conditions, particularly pain that gets worse in cold weather.

The two main types of moxibustion are classified as direct and indirect.

To learn more about the scientific basis of moxibustion please read this article in Acupuncture Today.

Cupping

What to expect after receiving Cupping

Cupping can cause some swelling and colored marks on the skin. As the skin is pulled into the cup, the blood vessels at the surface of the skin expand which may result in circular marks that look like bruising on the areas where the cups were applied. These marks are usually painless and disappear within 2 -10 days of treatment. The marks from cupping differ from bruising in that often as you undergo subsequent treatment, the marks become lighter, last for a shorter duration, and may not even occur at all - even though each time the cupping may have been focused on the same area, for the same duration and with the same amount of suction.

Often you will feel some relief almost immediately after receiving cupping. Even though the treatment is finished, it is still important to pay attention to the treated area. To assist you in making sure you have the best experience possible, please follow these directions for aftercare.

After your cupping session, please pay attention to the following:

Please be aware of the color and/or marks on your skin. While you gave consent for this treatment and may not even feel the marks, remember that your family and friends may be surprised to see them. Please explain the procedure to them and let them know you are not in pain or damaged.

After cupping it may take about a week or 10 days for the discoloration to fade. The better health you are in, the more quickly your body will clear the marks. If some areas take longer to clear it may indicate some stagnation in that region.

After treatment please avoid exposing the treated area to the elements: sun, heat, cold, wind, etc. for a minimum of 24 hours and optimally until the discoloration is faded. It is best to keep the area covered as much as possible until the marks have faded (scarves are your friend!).

Occasionally the skin will feel tender with an increased feeling of warmth and range of motion. The tenderness should only last 24-48 hours if you experience it.

It is best to avoid foods that are: heavy, greasy, sour or cold and alcohol until your marks fade. Broths and steamed vegetables are excellent choices post-cupping  treatment.

If you have any questions, please be in touch.

Cupping, or fire cupping, is the method of creating a vacuum next to the skin in order to relieve stagnation.  To create the vacuum in the glass cup, a flame is placed inside the cup to burn up the oxygen, the flame is then removed and the cup is quickly placed on the skin.  At no point does the flame come in contact with the skin.

 

Cupping is used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) to regulate the flow of qi and blood. The reverse pressure of the vacuum is used to draw the pathogenic factors out of the body and to open the pores of the skin. For this purpose cupping is often used in the treatment of external pathogens such as colds and flus.

Additionally, cupping is useful for treating musculo-skeletal conditions by facilitating the flow of qi and blood which relieves the stagnation that according to TCM is the primary cause of pain. By promoting better circulation and enhancing lymphatic flow cupping is extremely beneficial for relaxing stiff muscles and alleviating pain.

Cupping will almost always leave a slightly reddened, or darkly colored area where the cups were placed. This is response is normal, and is called “sha” – this is stagnation being released at the surface of the body. The color and how long the marks last depend on the length of the treatment, the strength of the suction and the condition being treated. As treatments continue, marks should progressively become lighter and fade more quickly.

It is normal for cupping marks to last 7 – 10 days. During this time you should take care to keep them from being exposed to extreme environmental factors such as wind, cold and heat. Additionally, rich and greasy foods should be avoided directly after cupping therapy, and as always, stay well hydrated. Your practitioner will ask your permission before using this modality, however be advised of the appearance of sha. Please educate your family and friends about your cupping treatment.

For more information on cupping, please refer to this article from the Institute for Traditional Medicine.

Gua sha

What to expect after receiving Gua Sha

Gua Sha treatment may produce marks ranging from a light pink color, to red or even purple-ish. The marks are the "sha" - and refer to the sand-like nature of the marks that appear.  These marks are usually painless, however, and disappear within a few days of treatment.  Gua Sha marks typically last 2-3 days, but it is possible for them to last longer depending on your condition.

Often you will feel some relief almost immediately after receiving cupping or gua sha. Even though the treatment is finished, it is still important to pay attention to the treated area. To assist you in making sure you have the best experience possible, please follow these directions for aftercare.

After your  Gua Sha session, please pay attention to the following:

Please be aware of the color and/or marks on your skin. While you gave consent for this treatment and may not even feel the marks, remember that your family and friends may be surprised to see them. Please explain the procedure to them and let them know you are not in pain or damaged.

After Gua Sha most of the discoloration will fade in 2-3 days. The better health you are in, the more quickly your body will clear the marks. If some areas take longer to clear it may indicate some stagnation in that region.

After treatment please avoid exposing the treated area to the elements: sun, heat, cold, wind, etc. for a minimum of 24 hours and optimally until the discoloration is faded. It is best to keep the area covered as much as possible until the marks have faded (scarves are your friend!).

Occasionally the skin will feel tender with an increased feeling of warmth and range of motion. The tenderness should only last 24-48 hours if you experience it.

It is best to avoid foods that are: heavy, greasy, sour or cold and alcohol until your marks fade. Broths and steamed vegetables are excellent choices post- gua sha treatment.

If you have any questions, please be in touch.

Gua sha is healing technique used throughout Asia. Gua means to rub or friction. Sha is the term used to describe congestion of blood at the surface of the body.

Gua Sha is often referred to as “scraping” and consists of friction applied in repeated even strokes to the skin with a tool of some sort (often made of buffalo horn or jade, but bottle caps work well, too!)so that sha surfaces as small red bumps. The sha may last 2 – 5 days. The color and rate of fading are both diagnostic and prognostic indicators.

Gua sha has many benefits: it moves stuck blood, promoting normal circulation to the muscles, tissues, and organs directly beneath the surface treated. Often you will experience immediate changes in stiffness, pain and mobility. Normal metabolic processes are restored by the movement of fluids as nutrients are carried to the tissues and metabolic wastes are carried away. Because gua sha mimics sweating, it resolves fever and can be useful in the very early stages of seasonal colds/flus.

 

Gua sha cools the patient who is overheated, warms the patient who is chilled, nourishes the patient who is deficient, and clears the patient who is excess. Gua sha is therefore considered an adaptogenic technique. Gua sha may be used in any case of pain or discomfort, for upper respiratory or digestive problems, and for any condition where palpation indicates there is sha.
Your practitioner will ask your permission before using this modality, however be advised of the appearance of sha.

Please educate your family and friends about your treatment. After receiving Gua sha, please keep the area covered, avoiding wind and exposure to the sun or sudden change in temperature until the marks have faded. Stretching is recommended but not a heavy workout on the day of treatment.

Herbs

Decoctions (tea) – in this preparation, raw herbs are placed in water and then boiled for a certain period of time.The liquid is strained and the resulting ‘tea’ is taken by mouth. This is an extremely effective way of taking an herbal formula that is rapidly absorbed and is very potent. Additionally, raw herbal formulas are easily individualized on a per patient basis.

Granules – in this modern preparation, ingredients (either a single herb or a formula) are decocted until they are a thick concentrate, and then made into powder or granules. Herbs administered in this fashion are potent and quickly absorbed, and may still have the potential to be customized. This type of preparation is common as it is much more time efficient for the patient, as prepared granules are just combined with water and ingested.

Tinctures – this type of preparation involves soaking ingredients in wine or other alcoholic spirits. The liquid is strained and the resulting tincture is often ingested warm. Tinctures can be used both internally and externally depending on the condition.

Tea Pills – this type of preparation involves finely grinding the ingredients and adding a liquid to bind them together as a pill. Tea pills are commercially prepared based in classical formulas and are not nearly as potent as decoctions. Herbal formulations prepared in this manner cannot be individualized, but are convenient and easily stored.

External herbal applications are extremely varied in their preparation and use: soaks and compresses, liniments, salves, plasters, patches, oils, and poultices. Some of these are commercially available, others may be made by the individual practitioner and customized for patients for the treatment of skin disorders (acne, eczema, rashes...etc), injuries, muscle soreness, arthritis, fractures and more.

Most often used to treat pain, these topicals not only contain an anesthetic like menthol or camphor, but also treat the underlying injury and promote healing. Generally these preparations contain herbs that kill pain by moving qi and blood - thereby reducing swelling and inflammation, breaking up accumulations of blood and fluids and restoring normal circulation to the affected area.

Chinese herbal formulas are part of the complete medical system including acupuncture and tui na that is referred to as Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). In treating disease, herbal medicine, like acupuncture focuses on pattern differentiation. This means that herbal formulas are utilized in treatment for particular patterns rather than particular symptoms. Herbal prescriptions can be used to treat both acute and chronic conditions and are a valuable part of TCM.

Herbal formulations can be administered in various ways both internally and externally. Internal formulas can be given in several different preparations including: decoctions, granules, tinctures, and tea pills. External formulas can be applied in multiple forms as well including: liniments, plasters, poultices, and soaks.

Above are the most common types of herbal preparations but there are some other ways herbs can be administered – including soft-gels, external powders, pastes, and soaks. Your practitioner will talk to you about all the options available and which one would be best for you and your condition.

 

For high quality supplements that we recommend – please visit our virtual dispensary.
Purchase products through our HealthWave virtual dispensary.

 

 

 

 

Kinesio tape

kinesio-tex tape

Kinesio-taping is a method utilizing flexible, water resistant tape that reduces inflammation and pain, relaxes over-used muscles, and supports muscles that may be weak. It is a method used by various health care practitioners including acupuncturists, orthopedists, physical therapists and chiropractors and is a great adjunct to these therapies.

Unlike athletic tape which is used to restrict joint movement in order to provide stabilization, kinesio-tape is flexible and provides light support without movement restriction. Additionally, athletic tape often can constrict circulation and lymph flow, whereas kinesio-tape enhances both by creating a gentle lift on the skin. By improving circulation and facilitating lymphatic drainage, kinesio-tape helps make the body’s own healing process more efficient, thereby reducing swelling, pain and healing time. This non-restrictive method of taping allows for full range of motion and can be worn for several days.

Popular in athletics (visible in the Olympic games and many professional sports), kinesio-tape can be used for preventive maintenance as well as to treat injury. Kinesio Tape is used for anything from headaches to foot problems and everything in between.

ktape for (L->R) achilles tendinitis, shoulder instability, ankle instability

Examples include: muscular facilitation or inhibition in pediatric patients, carpal tunnel syndrome, lower back strain/pain (subluxations, herniated disc), knee conditions, shoulder conditions, hamstring, groin injury, rotator cuff injury, whiplash, tennis elbow, plantar fasciitis, patella tracking, pre and post surgical edema, ankle sprains, athletic preventative injury method, and as a support method.

Generally kinesio-tape is left on for 3 -5 days. If you develop any itching or discomfort, remove immediately and make sure to notify your practitioner.

 cutting ktape